Wednesday, September 28, 2011

Cummins N14 Injector Troubleshooting

I found this interesting video from a Mechanic named Daniel who posted an in-depth video on troubleshooting and repairing an injector miss problem on a Cummins N14 injector. This is an electronic diesel model that has solenoid controlled injectors pulsed by the engine ECM. It's an interesting video and very detailed for the aspiring Cummins N14 Mechanic.

Cummins N14 Injector Troubleshooting and Repair "With this particular injector the way it works is that the solenoid is in an always open position allowing fuel from the rail into the injector and only closes during the downward stroke of the metering plunger so as not to allow the fuel to go back to the rail, rather trapping it in the injector and metering it to the cylinder. Technically, with this particular injector it would be more that the injector fuel supply is “closed” electronically at the injector. danielresume 6 months ago The solenoid is the only aspect of this injector that is electronic and governed by the ECM. It has been my experience that when these solenoids get weak or fail completely the engine might still run at idle without a misfire but under power will miss and have no power. The injector also has a ceramic check ball and metering plunger which will cause the same condition under power if worn as they will allow fuel to escape under pressure rather than injecting to the cylinder." I hope this Mechanic tip has been helpful.

2 comments:

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Dan Luttrell said...

This makes me wonder about the International t444E engine injector buzz test during the key on engine off test. The buzz should be strong at each of the injectors one at a time, then the buzz is followed by the individual sequence of the eight clicks per injectors on the V-8. If you do not hear an individual click or even the individual injector buzz during the part of the testing, one would think International software would have a code come up for that as well. The one that usually kicks up is the bank of injectors that has the issue. Just throwing out a thought about electronic/hydraulic type fuel injectors. You can ohm test wiring all day long and not trace down the issue. The buzz test usually helps but not always. The more connections you have in a circuit the more chances you have at electical problems. Any thoughts on the 513 code? Even with the valve cover and harness replaced, I've heard you should always zip-tie your connections. I've got a couple I am bringing in the shop since they have age and electrical issues, they will be good ones to trouble shoot. Appreciate your technician website.